Spectroscopy and Machine Vision Solutions

What is Raman spectroscopy?
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Unlike NIR spectroscopy, where water can be a considerable interfering factor, water is not a problem for the Raman signal. Both spectroscopies can be complementary in terms of possible applications: given a certain practical case, the results achievable by both technologies have to be compared in order to select the most suitable one, as the factors to be considered are not only metrological.

However, a number of applications of Raman spectroscopy are listed below:

  • Characterisation of crystallisation processes.
  • Control of the polymerisation process.
  • Identification of components.
  • Hydrogenation reactions.
  • Quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in low concentrations.
  • Control of the fermentation process and extraction of APIs.
  • Characterisation of organic or inorganic substances.
  • Geology and mineralogy.
  • Semiconductors.
  • Materials research.
What is Raman spectrocopy used for in industry?
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Like NIR spectroscopy, Raman probes are ideal media for use as PAT tools.  Unlike NIR spectroscopy, where water can be a considerable interfering factor, water is not a problem for the Raman signal. The two spectroscopies can be complementary in terms of possible applications: given a certain case study, the results achievable by both technologies have to be compared in order to select the most suitable one, as the factors to be considered are not only metrological.